Drabblecast 069 - The Storyteller

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In general, are your favorite authors living or dead?

Living
8
53%
Dead
6
40%
Other
1
7%
 
Total votes: 15

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Mr. Tweedy
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Drabblecast 069 - The Storyteller

Post by Mr. Tweedy » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:50 pm

The Storyteller by Saki

"The story began badly," said the smaller of the small girls, "but it had a beautiful ending."
"It's the most beautiful story I've ever heard," said the bigger of the small girls, with immense decision.
"It's the only beautiful story I ever heard," said Cyril.


Saki (aka Norm's homeboy)

Drabble - Sacrifices by Abigail Hilton

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strawman
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Post by strawman » Wed Jun 18, 2008 11:03 pm

Thank you, Tom, for helping keep the DC raft afloat!

My favorite Saki story so far. Maybe because Munro provides direct evidence that snipers are a greater danger than second-hand smoke, which is a truth you don't hear much these days.
Norm, you really make the stories 3 dimensional.
Hard to envision a little girl saying
"By the old Moulmein Pagoda, lookin' eastward to the sea" 2000 times, but it sure is a great setup for keeping the kids quiet for 10 minutes.
And I agree with Tom about the banjo riff: Dueling Storytellers . But for me, the high point was the great bbardle ending!

Genius!
Never judge anyone until you have biopsied their brain.

"Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle."
Known Some Call Is Air Am
Spoiler:
Non sum qualis eram = "I am not who I will be"

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tbaker2500
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Post by tbaker2500 » Thu Jun 19, 2008 12:16 am

Horribly good episode!

I'm noticing that you're getting the Drabble and main story to match. Nice.

The drabble was great.

The main story by Saki was excellently written. The meta-story telling concept is executed grandly. While nothing about the plot was extraordinary, the writing and the telling were.

My favorite spot was the banjo hit following "You don't seem to be a success as a story teller." I never would have thought of a banjo right there, but it was utterly perfect.

Tom

P.S. Mr Tweedy, you're getting slow! ;-)
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alhilton
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Saki!

Post by alhilton » Thu Jun 19, 2008 3:47 am

Ooo, that was lovely. Horribly lovely!

Sacrifices was partially inspired (years ago) by Saki's Sredni Vashtar (that and working at the zoo). Norm paired it with a Saki story! I am too tickled for words.

~Abbie

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Mr. Tweedy
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Post by Mr. Tweedy » Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:20 am

tbaker2500 wrote:P.S. Mr Tweedy, you're getting slow! ;-)
It's actually more that I'm at work when I do most of my posting. :twisted:
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Post by bolddeceiver » Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:14 am

Such a hard poll question. I ended up checking "living," because on a day-to-day basis, I feel much more of a connection with living, contemporary writers, and read their work more often. However, some of my very favorites -- both classics like Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, or Hemmingway, and more recently deceased like Azimov or Vonneghut (hard one to classify, since while he is dead, at the time that I got the most out of his writing, he was living).

Munro would definitely be an example of dead writers who I love. The moment I saw the filename I was in heaven, and that feeling lasted all through. Saki is one of those bright shining gems in the history of English-language prose, and among the most consistently laugh-out-loud writers I know of (if you don't believe, I challenge you to read The Occasional Garden in complete silence).
...the pagoda-like enclosure, where Japanese sand-badgers disported themselves...

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Post by deflective » Thu Jun 19, 2008 8:10 am

thanks for continuing to bring us Saki. every single story has been a winner.
strawman wrote:My favorite Saki story so far. Maybe because Munro provides direct evidence that snipers are a greater danger than second-hand smoke, which is a truth you don't hear much these days.
that cigarette may have killed him. during wwi snipers would shoot at the embers of a smoke, probably why Saki was bitching at his friend to put it out.

the superstition that it's unlucky to light three cigarettes off one match supposedly came from this time. light one: sniper notices you, light two: he's taken aim, light three: you're dead.

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Chivalrybean
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Post by Chivalrybean » Thu Jun 19, 2008 5:05 pm

Grumples Why is this not on my iPod? I must need to change something after the feed change...

So far though, judging from the past, I like Sake the writer better than saki the drink.

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Post by tbaker2500 » Thu Jun 19, 2008 6:04 pm

Chivalrybean wrote:Grumples Why is this not on my iPod? I must need to change something after the feed change...

So far though, judging from the past, I like Sake the writer better than saki the drink.
What client are you using, iTunes or other?
If iTunes, right click on the drabblecast feed, and click "update podcast" to force a re-check. If it still doesn't work, click on the Drabblecast main podcast heading, and click on the "i" all the way to the right. it should tell you the URL. Message me with what it reads, and I'll see what the problem is.

Tom
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strawman
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Post by strawman » Thu Jun 19, 2008 9:32 pm

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.h ... 946697D6CF

The French move to tax dead authors, as their success interferes with the sales of young and struggling writers. Move apparently being studied with interest by the British, as it is one of those rare things no one had previously thought to tax.

Preliminary discussions are underway studying the feasibility of levying real estate taxes on grave plots. Which has been objected to on the grounds that no additional incentive should be provided for leaving corpses at the curb in trash bags.

And so I cast my vote for dead authors, on the basis that taxes should be paid, whenever possible, by people who don't mind paying them. But why only writers? Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Carnegie are the really superrich dead people. Surely they wrote something?
Never judge anyone until you have biopsied their brain.

"Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle."
Known Some Call Is Air Am
Spoiler:
Non sum qualis eram = "I am not who I will be"

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Post by Goldenrat » Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:48 pm

Another bloody cool Saki story. Thought the production of was really good and loved Norm's portrayal of the lil' poppets.

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Post by tastycakes » Fri Jun 20, 2008 4:29 pm

Holy hell. This story had a few laugh-out-loud moments for me. All of them, of course, resulted from Norm's production of this story. The aforementioned Banjo got me, as well as the obnoxious little boy saying "BETT'IR". I also really liked the inclusion of the music to give the Bachelor's story a little more intensity. This is my favorite of the Saki stories that have been read on DC so far.

I really believe that a story can be totally made or ruined by the its setting, and there are few better than a train coach.

As far as authors: Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, Keroauc, Vonnegut, Wolfe - all dead (boring lineup I know). The livings that I love: Updike, Zadie Smith, and the incomparable J.D. Salinger.
One day he will look into what a ‘stigmata’ really is; for now, it is his trump card for getting out of work. He simply says ‘stigmata’ and they say ‘shit, hope you feel better soon.’ End of story.

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Chivalrybean
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Post by Chivalrybean » Sat Jun 21, 2008 3:10 pm

strawman wrote:Thank you, Tom, for helping keep the DC raft afloat!

My favorite Saki story so far. Maybe because Munro provides direct evidence that snipers are a greater danger than second-hand smoke, which is a truth you don't hear much these days.
Norm, you really make the stories 3 dimensional.
Hard to envision a little girl saying
"By the old Moulmein Pagoda, lookin' eastward to the sea" 2000 times, but it sure is a great setup for keeping the kids quiet for 10 minutes.
And I agree with Tom about the banjo riff: Dueling Storytellers . But for me, the high point was the great bbardle ending!

Genius!
Actully, it is entirely possible that the smoke and the flaming red of the ciggarette drew the snipers eye and caused Saki's death, killing future stories he may have written.

Thanks.

(While true, that was meant to be humorous, and I don't blame the tabacco industry.)
---

It wasn't in my iPod before because I had the new feed, added that to my iPod sync list, then it was gone and I hadn't selected the old one again.
---

Great story! I laughed. 'Nuff said.

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strawman
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Post by strawman » Sat Jun 21, 2008 3:17 pm

It wouldn't hurt to spread the word about Munro's last words and death to anti-smoking zealots.
Famous last words. :!:
Never judge anyone until you have biopsied their brain.

"Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle."
Known Some Call Is Air Am
Spoiler:
Non sum qualis eram = "I am not who I will be"

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Post by Igwiz » Wed Jun 25, 2008 7:46 pm

This is my first post on the forums, so my apologies if it's not a glowing appraisal. But, this is was not my favorite edition of the Drabblecast. I'm not sure if it was the dated nature of the material or the lenghy lead-up to the meat of the story, but it left me wanting more with regards to the writing.

Now, the production is another matter. Well done, Norm. The music, sound effects and narration were spot on, mate. As usual, I couldn't have asked for more. And, I have to agree with a previous poster, who I paraphrase as, "The Drabblecast makes some of my other podcasts seem a bit drab..."

Well done, Norm, with a story that I felt needed a good deal of... background support.
"The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, 'You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done.'" ~ George Carlin

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Mr. Tweedy
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Re: Saki!

Post by Mr. Tweedy » Thu Jun 26, 2008 5:13 am

alhilton wrote:Ooo, that was lovely. Horribly lovely!

Sacrifices was partially inspired (years ago) by Saki's Sredni Vashtar (that and working at the zoo). Norm paired it with a Saki story! I am too tickled for words.

~Abbie
Funny, in "Sredni Vashtar" a bad adult is punished and a child benefits. Your drabble is the reverse. I liked it. It had a creepy Roald Dahl vibe to it. An eccentric character who provides joys for good children and arranges gruesome punishment for bad ones... Is your narrator related to the owner of a certain chocolate factory?

The story was also rather Dahl-y. Or is it that Dahl is Saki-y? Saki did come first...

In either case, I really enjoyed this and I correctly predicted that my wife (Mrs. Tweedy) would get a kick out of it too. I doubt it was what Saki intended, but I thought making the story-teller American was a nice touch. It played into all the stereotypes perfectly: The American is clever, resourceful and proactive, but also kind of a jerk. He gets the job done but in such a way that he offends the very person he was doing a service to. Perfect production that brought out the humor in the story very nicely. The humor doesn't go all-out trying to make any points, but it does give a nice little lesson in how not to teach things to children.

My favorite authors are mostly dead. I've enjoyed some very good stories by author's with beating hearts (recently read "Wizard's First Rule" on the recommendation of people here; some very good stuff in there), but the books that have really influenced me have mostly been by dead people. I doubt that has as much to with dead people being better writers and a lot to do with the the dead having had a lot of Darwinian weeding so that only the enduring works have, um, endured. That, and the dead have already finished their careers, so we can read their best work, whereas living authors might not have written their best yet.

Shucks if the dead don't get all the perks. :x Maybe we should tax them. Lucky stiffs.
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Post by normsherman » Thu Jun 26, 2008 5:34 pm

I actually had Clovis, the prankster from the She-Wolf, in mind as the American/Texan "bachelor". He turns up in different Saki stories and usually has a mischievous role so I thought it'd be funny to have him turn up occasionally when we do one here.
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Post by Richmazzer » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:29 pm

I really enjoyed this story. The voices were great, overall a good introduction to Saki and to Drabblecast!

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Re: Drabblecast 069 - The Storyteller

Post by sandrilde » Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:00 pm

Very fun story, good production -

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