Drabblecast 173 - Go Beep

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deflective
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by deflective » Sun Aug 08, 2010 8:37 pm

great stuff.
at the beginning of the story i was thinking of the kith sketch, it was circa nirvana.

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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by ejbman » Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:33 am

There is so much to love about this entire episode, I'm not sure where to begin. I have to concur with all the positives so far, with the exception that nobody seems to have adequately recognized the coolness of Black Smut!

As others have said, the production on this episode really took an already decent story over the top into excellence. Well done. With creme brulee on top.
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by themorg » Mon Aug 16, 2010 12:40 pm

ejbman wrote: nobody seems to have adequately recognized the coolness of Black Smut!
i did not think it was that good of a name. It seemed more like a place holder or an allegory for something within the collective consciousness.
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by ejbman » Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:37 am

themorg wrote:
ejbman wrote: nobody seems to have adequately recognized the coolness of Black Smut!
i did not think it was that good of a name. It seemed more like a place holder or an allegory for something within the collective consciousness.
I thought the fact that it was 'an allegory for something within the collective consciousness', among other things, was why it was a good name. But the name wasn't the best part - it was the fact that the song represented a perfect example of the unselfconscious brain-farting beat poetry of garage band teenagers everywhere, so archetypically rendered, so sweetly emphatic, so exemplary of the overweening, hormone-fueled optimism of youthful energy. The name and the content were practically irrelevant, and the particular way the author crafted the content as essentially non-sensical and irrelevant helped highlight that - not unlike Go Beep - their song made no sense. But since Black Smut came from a sincere (if barely competent) place, it was the humanity, the emotion - the very weight of the human flaws within it - that dislodged the manic, memetic fervor of the commercial Go Beep song.

Or somethin' like that...
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by strawman » Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:19 am

WOW. I am overwhelmed with the thought that someone may one day earn a doctorate with Drabblecast deconstruction. And with more Doctors around, someone can care for Medicare patients.
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by ejbman » Tue Aug 17, 2010 11:15 pm

Deconstruction is dead. Absurd is the new black (Smut). Down with the tryanny of the sensible. Blork, sneeblegrop in etgerstogen.
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by Diether » Thu Aug 19, 2010 4:17 am

eggyolk wrote:There are times when Norm gets a great story.
There are times when Norm makes and okay story great with production value.

This was not one of those times.
This was an awesome story made mind-blowing awesome by Norms production value.

I listened to this story three times and was rolling over myself laughing. Hell I was rolling over my kids too, it was just that funny.

This is a classic.
Beep.
I agree. (Athough no kids were hurt in my rolling.)

Beep and double Beep.

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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by flyawaybefree » Mon Aug 23, 2010 3:23 am

I loved this story- it was unique and very interesting, while at the same time very relatable. It feels just like something those "damn crazy young'uns next door" would do. Plus I was going beep in my head for the next day and a half. Overall, another point for the already awesome Drabblecast!
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by bolddeceiver » Sat Sep 11, 2010 6:01 am

This really felt to me like the equal-and-opposite to Jelly Park (and I find both to be totally awesome). I don't feel equipped at the moment to delve into the details of this argument, but I'm going to go back and listen to JP again so that I can within the next day or so.

Anyways, awesome episode; I've been catching up on some back issues, and earlier this afternoon I listened to Mongoose and thought my People's Choice was proably already decided for the year. Now I'm not so sure.
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by El Barto » Fri Sep 17, 2010 10:31 pm

I always love episodes with Norm's music but this story fell flat for me for some reason. Likely to do with lack of explanations for big jumps in the plot. I can believe that someone will someday write a song that is insanely catchy but there's no explanation at all for how it suddenly got onto every tv and radio station simultaneously. But even if we assume that it was such a compelling song that everyone immediately told their friends and all the people at every radio and tv station decided to put it on live, there's absolutely no explaining why or how the song "black smut" saved the world.

Presumably, any song played loud enough out the window would break people from their Go Beep reverie but the author didn't suggest that there was really anything particularly special about black smut and completely glossed over why/how posting it to YouTube would break the world out of its collective trance. After all, unless black smut was also hypnotic and causing people to forward it around like mad, no one would know it existed from a few tweets and a promo video.

Overall I do get that it was a teenage fantasy with warnings about conformism, and therefore close inspection of the plot is arguably foolish, but I was expecting something more to the story than a single person realizes that the song is a trap and then plays other music and the whole world is saved.

All that said, I'm thrilled to see so many people absolutely loved this story.

Beep!

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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by moonowl » Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:32 am

Stop making this thread go to the top. Because as soon as I read the title that damn song earworms me again!

(beep beeep!)
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by themorg » Sun Sep 19, 2010 9:43 am

ejbman wrote:since Black Smut came from a sincere (if barely competent) place, it was the humanity, the emotion - the very weight of the human flaws within it - that dislodged the manic, memetic fervor of the commercial Go Beep song.
I have to disagree that black smut was a sincere place but a desperate one. The human flaw i see was thinking outside the box when everyone they knew were basically zombies and he decided to write a song to counter act the zombie like state. In the story it was the thing that saved them but the main character was super flawed in thinking it would help the world if i started a rock band to stop an alien attack.

ejbman wrote: it was the fact that the song represented a perfect example of the unselfconscious brain-farting beat poetry of garage band teenagers everywhere, so archetypically rendered, so sweetly emphatic, so exemplary of the overweening, hormone-fueled optimism of youthful energy.
I agree with the archetypal nature of both the character and the music and where he came from. It makes the character easy to understand and gives the reader an easy place holder without hours or reading commitment. It also stays away from overwhelming stereotypes that you can both point out and say i know this guy but the listener knows he is different.
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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by Unblinking » Thu Nov 04, 2010 4:06 pm

Auugggghhh! Earworm! Get it out! Get it out!

Erm... Sorry about that outburst. I don't know what came over me. The earworm is telling me to tell you that I liked the story, and that it would not have done as well in text without the audio. The earworm also says that, not only was it catchy, it made an interesting point comparing pop to counterculture music, and pointing out that when you get right down to it, they're not as different as both sides would have you think. And the earworm is telling me that the protagonist made quite a good unreliable narrator, especially since, seen from the outside, his only real objective is to stop people from being happy--typical grunge-rocker. Colon+Right-Parenthesis. As you can see, the earworm does not grasp the form or purpose of emoticons. This is because the earworm has no eyes, and its mouth cannot smile, only vivisect and slurp.

The earworm is now telling me it's time for me to sleep so that it can finish eating my brain. Good night, earworm. Good night, all.

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Re: Drabblecast 173- Go Beep by Aliya Whiteley

Post by JEJoll » Wed Aug 14, 2013 2:12 am

I must say, I absolutely hated both of the stories by Aliya Whiteley that appeared on The Drabblecast prior to this one. To refresh, they were Jelly Park and Witchcraft in the Harem.

In fact, when Jelly Park won the People's Choice Award, I was completely flabbergasted. Its victory over the others--nay, its very nomination--made me believe that a planetary infestation of nanoscopic, mind-controlling and electronically-migrating silkworms made their way through the various pathways of the internet, onto the computers and phones of the people who downloaded the story, out through their speakers and finally into their new homes in said peoples' brains where they caused a spike in dopamine during their migration, causing people to believe it was a good story. I think I was spared infection because I listened to the story long after it was initially published on The Drabblecast and the silkworms had long since found alternate means of transport.

That being said, when I noticed that this story was by Aliya Whiteley, I almost didn't even bother to give it a listen, what with risk of infection and all. But I trusted the judgement of Norm and the crew and, through this story, Miss Whiteley has redeemed herself in my eyes (even though her story Jelly Park harbored the growth of an alien race bent on the destruction or enslavement of humankind).

It was a great story, made even greater by the amazing job done on production. The new renditions of Nirvana's music, some of which I found elevator-esque, were awesome. And that's saying something, because I have never heard a cover of Nirvana that I liked. I think Kurt would have approved.

Come to think of it, I think he'd be a big fan of The Drabblecast. You guys should run a story about fetuses hanging from trees...

But I digress.

Aliya did a good, consistent job on the voice of the narrator. I believed a rebel-without-a-cause garage-band-rocking teenager was telling me the story. There was a lot of good and sometimes subtle humor in this one.

And I think the main thing that won me over with this was when it came to light that the protagonist was in conflict with the mainstream--something my teenage self could definitely relate to, and something that has leaked into my adult life. And that's something that I think turned me off of Jelly Park. The whole song and dance of it. Because it was portrayed as good in jelly park, and I didn't like, and didn't want to like it. But in Go Beep, it was portrayed as bad, and, even though I did find the Go Beep song catchy, and I did enjoy it, I didn't want to because it seemed too upbeat and happy for my personality, and therefore, bad. So I found the protagonist to be my ally when he went against it.

Anyway... Enough said.

Aliya, you're alright in my book.

But I also wanted to throw my two cents at Etaan:
Etaan wrote: I think that 17 is about right. And at that age, if I knew that my parents were brainwashed zombies and I was just sitting around staring at my friends for hours on end, I would have taken the opportunity to sneak a beer. I had a hard time figuring when it was supposed to be happening, however. Youtube and iTunes are current, but in that case these kids grew up 7-10 years behind the peak of Nirvana's popularity and it seems strange that they would be that into them.

Also, what's double math?
Firstly, double math is two periods of math class back-to-back. An attempt on the protagonist's part to be a bummer. Unless you're the 1 out of 10 kind of person who understand binary :p.

Secondly, as I write this I'm twenty-four. I love Nirvana without bounds. To save you the math, I was six when Kurt died, and I didn't know who he was. Nirvana has transcended time and has become loved by many even beyond their prime. Just like Edgar Allen Poe. The messages in the music are very human, very angsty-teen and, I think, universal. I think the time of the story is the present.

P.S.
I can't remember which episode it was on, but the McDonald's drive-thru order rap was top notch. I'd put that shizz on a CD, yo. Nah'm say'n Norm?
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Re: Drabblecast 173 - Go Beep

Post by JEJoll » Wed Aug 14, 2013 2:21 am

P.P.S.
Sorry for bringing back the earworm.
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Re: Drabblecast 173 - Go Beep

Post by Varda » Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:08 pm

Wow. And I thought nothing could compare with "Jelly Park". This was utterly charming, awesomely produced, and damn catchy. Beep!

Did anyone else think of "Gifting Bliss" too, what with the Kurt Cobain references?
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