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Drabblecast 090 - Far Far Away

Posted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 8:47 pm
by Mr. Tweedy
Far Far Away by Frank Key

The bullet-riddled corpses of our dead crew-mates, all sixteen of them, are coffined up, and the coffins stacked as a makeshift ping pong table...

Drabble - Train Dreams by Matthew Bey

Hooting Yard

Image

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 12:22 am
by strawman
Don't know whether it's Frank Key or Norm Sherman here who makes Tim Burton seem like Kathy Lee Gifford. I sense that DC forum members are all drumming their fingers and staring at the ceiling, waiting to see if help will come, or if they will know what help is when they see it. Way weirder than HGTTG. More like Betty Boop does Carlos Castaneda weird.

The whole story was a twist. Gotta hand it to Norm for going for the love monkey gusto. But sure sounds like Key got into the shrooms.

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 1:06 am
by Mr. Tweedy
Blame it on my complete lack of taste, sophistication and education, but Frank Key's writing does nothing for me. I listened to a few episodes of Hooting Yard a while ago and my impression of this story was about the same as of those. It sounded like this: *play loud TV static sound* I appreciate absurdity (obviously, being that I'm here), but Key takes things to this extreme post-absurd place where things make so little sense that there isn't any context from which to appreciate. It gets to the point where it's just a lot of random sentences strung together for no apparent reason, like when you put those little word magnets on your fridge at random.

Frank's key imbibes the futile aroma of post-traumatic peanuts biting fossil leaves. Woe to it.

The drabble was cute. Mismatched trains couple to produce little carnival roller coasters. That's absurdity I can appreciate.

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 2:42 am
by tbaker2500
Mr. Tweedy wrote:Blame it on my complete lack of taste, sophistication and education, but Frank Key's writing does nothing for me. I listened to a few episodes of Hooting Yard a while ago and my impression of this story was about the same as of those. It sounded like this: *play loud TV static sound* I appreciate absurdity (obviously, being that I'm here), but Key takes things to this extreme post-absurd place where things make so little sense that there isn't any context from which to appreciate. It gets to the point where it's just a lot of random sentences strung together for no apparent reason, like when you put those little word magnets on your fridge at random.
I haven't listened this this episode yet, but I do listen to hooting yard. For all the reasons listed above, I love listening to it to go to sleep. I have yet to find something more peaceful.

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 1:59 pm
by G. E. Lee
I have a lot of sympathy for Mr. Tweedy's position. I've listened to a few episodes of Hooting Yard. I realy enjoy it, but I'm simply not up to it most of the time, mentally. I've actually found that Mr. Keys work is much better read than heard. It's been a while since I visited his site, but I believe you can actually read much of his work there.
I think Norm did a great job performing this piece. I've gotten used to hearing Frank Keys read a lot of other peoples work (he's got a great voice) but it was nice to see the tables turned.
Great drabble, by the way. Interesting what happens when we take casual speech (or even technical speech, in this case) litteraly.

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:03 pm
by Goldenrat
I love choo-choo trains and I thought the drabble was neat. Far, Far, Away was a tough one. I chuckled a few times but mostly I sat there dumbfounded and stupified like a slack-jawed bufoon. Probably one of my least favorite drabblecast stories. :(

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 2:32 am
by tbaker2500
My facial expressions while listening to this episode:

Intro- :D :) :o :D
Drabble- :?: :?: :?:
Story- :? :) :) :D :D :D :D

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 3:25 am
by tastycakes
tbaker2500 wrote:My facial expressions while listening to this episode:

Intro- :D :) :o :D
Drabble- :?: :?: :?:
Story- :? :) :) :D :D :D :D
:roll:

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 1:03 pm
by Wonko
I'm not sure why, but I got an indefinable Star Trek vibe from this story. All in all, I liked it, although the nature of the story as a whole put me in a disconcerted mood for the rest of the day.

Also: Norm saying "Magnetic Mute Blind Love Monkeys" was the best thing I've heard this week.

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 1:25 pm
by strawman
These comments are a fitting tribute to Mr. Key, and would not have appeared out of place if randomly transposted to the Hooting Yard. Deep calls to deep, y'all.

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 4:29 pm
by deadjon
I enjoyed this one. I envisioned most of the characters as if they were from the Elliot Moose books, which I often read to my preschool aged children at night. Lumpin looked like Lionel, and the narrator was probably Elliot Moose himself (though older and wiser). I guess the other Elliot Moose characters were in the coffins. But the captain, oh my captain, and Pillbrow II looked like nutcrackers or tin soldiers.

So with that in my head it all seemed to make sense.

I was probably also primed by the drabble, because in our house trains -- Thomas or otherwise -- are most definitely living creatures. Hey, is four years old too young for the drabblecast?

Posted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 12:11 pm
by cammoblammo
Wow, that was a little bizarre.

I certainly seem to be getting money's worth with the Drabblecast lately---I have to listen to everything at least twice to figure out what's going on. Perhaps I'm not as strange a listener as once I thought?

I'll give this one another crack tomorrow.

I dug the drabble though.

Posted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 1:14 pm
by strawman
Mr. Tweedy wrote:It sounded like this: *play loud TV static sound* I appreciate absurdity (obviously, being that I'm here), but Key takes things to this extreme post-absurd place where things make so little sense that there isn't any context from which to appreciate.
Don't you realize that if you apply the proper algorithm, you discover that the static on your TV set is actually the DaVinci Code?

Never underestimate static

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:22 pm
by cammoblammo
Okay, I've had a second listen.

It's been said many times that there's a fine line between genius and insanity. Not only did Frank miss the line, he backed over it, spun the wheels and replaced the line with two parallel skid marks heading toward the lush foliage full of love monkey eggs. Need I mention he's captaining (oh, the captain!) a crumpled car (a Galaxy, I presume) made of corrugated cardboard?

I still have no idea what it was about. But I enjoyed it immensely.

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 11:01 pm
by Kehama
This story has just captured my "Favorite Story Evar!" crown. I've watched, read, and listened to a lot of sci-fi and I've always wondered what it must feel like to go completely bonkers on a long space voyage. Well, now I know. Honestly, most stories are told from the persepective of the one sane guy on the ship but this one got me inside the head of the crazy guy. I loved it. I think what put it over the top for me was the gravitas with the which the blind, mute, magnetic love monkeys were referred. Fan-freakin'-tastic.

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 11:25 pm
by DKT
Not much idea of an idea at all what was going on here, but it was still somehow fun to listen to.

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:09 am
by normsherman
Yah, this was a weird one. Some of Frank Key's stuff that I've read had that random quality that Mr. Tweedy was talking about, but this one, to me at least, was different. It had more direction, more substantial characters.
For some reason I wasn't phased at all that Pilbrow II's main motivation for setting the ship's course out to some distant planet was to bang some mute blind love monkeys. I loved the typical scifi/horror/thriller feel of being in the wake of some disaster that left stacked corpses and a raving captain- mixed with vaguely Red Dwarf/HGTTG absurdity.
Also it's really fun reading Key's stories because there is a strangely poetic quality to the lines. And he has great words (people seemed to like the magnetic mute blind love monkeys line, but my favorite was saying "lockets, brooches, finnicky bittybobs...")

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 2:38 am
by tastycakes
I really liked this story. Mostly because when I first heard it, I was imagining Spaceman Spiff from Calvin and Hobbes. The monkeys and corrugated cardboard fit right into that setting. Granted, the story was probably a little to extreme even for Calvin's imagination, but still good to me.

i can munch on this

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:18 am
by StalinSays
I can identify with the current of frustration welling up in this topic: even with multiple listens, there's no opaque point of examination. Insubstantial as it may be though, I find true value in something so playfully composed, approached with indifference for convention. It's the difference between art rock, or perhaps jazz, and say Coldplay. You can be good at giving people what they expect to hear, or good at driving them delirious with snippets.

The Drabblecast is a tin of mixed nuts, each with its distinct flavor. The willfully bizarre and effervescent, like ep. 90 here, or ep. 74 Magic in the Harem, are walnuts. Pick em' out if desired - I find the irreplaceable to the overall mouthful.

Re: i can munch on this

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:34 am
by Mr. Tweedy
StalinSays wrote:The Drabblecast is a tin of mixed nuts, each with its distinct flavor. The willfully bizarre and effervescent, like ep. 90 here, or ep. 74 Magic in the Harem, are walnuts. Pick em' out if desired - I find the irreplaceable to the overall mouthful.
You eat multiple walnuts in one mouthful? Egads! And I thought that avatar pic was just an illustration :!:

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Has anyone else player Little Big Planet?