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THE RULES(?)

Posted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 3:14 pm
by Mr. Tweedy
What exactly is entailed by the Creative Commons license? I've got to credit the original creators, I can't sell the copies and I can't change it. What's "change" (aside from a campaign catch phrase)? Can I distribute just a part of a Drabblecast, or do the rules say I've got to have the whole thing, end to end?

For instance, could I post just the story portion of "The She Wolf" on my web site and credit it as "The She Wolf as performed on The Drabblecast"? Or could I pull out a bbardle and call it "Insane Ditty by Norm Sherman, first heard on The Drabblecast"? Also, is it a violation of the license to use part of the Drabblecast as a soundtrack for a movie or to use a sound bit on another podcast?

I guess that's all one question: Can we cut a CC podcast up and use the parts in our own stuff or has it got to stay intact? (This is assuming, of course, that "our own stuff" is itself free content and explicitly credits the Drabblecast as source material.)

Posted: Sun Mar 23, 2008 1:12 am
by normsherman
http://creativecommons.org/license actually explains a lot of it. Essentially you can tailor a CC license the way you want it.
Some are much more restrictive than others, so it's a mistake to think all CC licenses are pretty much the same.
Ours means you can share the content anywhere you aren't making money from it as long as you attribute it to DC. So:

In theory, if you used part of it or cut parts up, added or remixed it you'd have to get our permission first (hence the no derivites part). That's why I'm starting to put the songs out as a seperate mp3- it will save people the trouble of having to ask if they can use it, because it's an understood "yes" as long as it's attributed. I don't give a crap about people cutting up my intros or songs but since there is work by other authors in DC the license has to provide a layer of security for them.
But we'd probably be cool with most things you could think to do with our content spliced up so don't hesitate to ask.
Generally, the more detailed the appropriating (changing parts of so and so's story for something public and adding music to it or something) the more need for permission.