Page 1 of 1

Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 6:43 am
by StalinSays
Feature: Bad Habit by Richard Weems
Feature: Tags by Andrew Gudgel
Feature: A Happy Family by Nathaniel Tower

Image

Tuesday, October 25, 2011
The next installment of the Drabblecast's vaunted trifecta series, this time it's all about 'getting the boot.'

Episode Sponsor You Shall Never Know Security by J.R. Hamantaschen


Read by: Kimi Alexander and Abner Senires
Music by: Gringo Motel
Twabble: Strawman

Art by Liz Pennies

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 7:45 pm
by strawman
I like themed Trifectas; like This American Life, it's a shot at perspectives. But giving birth to a boot? A nun wrestling with a naked pervert (whack, whack indeed), and claiming a theme of alienation and rejection? More like a theme of silliness. Another example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4lYMFiwABI

I would like to express gratitude to JR for his sponsorship. But the interview was probably not the most effective way to excite appetite for his stories.

"Aw, did the strawman get up on the wrong side of the bed today?"

"Shut up"

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 4:53 am
by JRH
strawman wrote:I like themed Trifectas; like This American Life, it's a shot at perspectives. But giving birth to a boot? A nun wrestling with a naked pervert (whack, whack indeed), and claiming a theme of alienation and rejection? More like a theme of silliness. Another example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4lYMFiwABI

I would like to express gratitude to JR for his sponsorship. But the interview was probably not the most effective way to excite appetite for his stories."
This is just to clarify to the 1% of Drabblecasters who listened to the interview. I am extremely appreciative of everything Norm has done to promote the collection. One thing I would like to make a littler clearer is that to say I've "sponsoring" these podcasts is a little inaccurate. My work first came to the Cast's attention when Norm ran a story of mine, and he really liked it. Once the collection came out, we sent Norm a complimentary copy (based on my fond experience working with him), and (while I do not want to speak for him), he really took to the collection, was excited about it, and was interested in it. We talked on the phone for about 40 minutes, 15 or so of those minutes made it into this version of the interview. As we shoot the shit, I think I make it pretty clear (in a segment that didn't make the cut, for pacing reasons), that the interview is not designed to excite appetite for the stories, but was rather intended to just be a discussion between two fans of dark fiction. If you thought I was too self deprecating, irreverent, or unfocused in the interview, well damn, you should have heard the full 40 minutes - it gets worse. In sum, while I no doubt agree that this interview likely won't do much to excite appetite for my stories, I never had any intention for it to do so when Norm told me he was interested in the work and wanted to talk about it.

Speaking of rambling . . . but it's midnight here and I'm tired . . .

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:43 pm
by Unblinking
"Bad Habit" I could've done without. The idea of a vigilante nun was fun, but it was too heavy on the penis descriptions that were used to such a degree that they distracted from the vigilante nun herself. I know what a penis looks like, can we move on?

"Tags" I really enjoyed, a commentary on how we use technology. When I was a kid I knew the phone numbers of my friends, family members. Now they're all in my phone memory, and I only know my own phone #. "Why bother to remember that number?" I'd answer if anyone ventured to ask. "It's going to change when they move, and I have too many numbers to remember. Let the phone handle it." I think this is a general shift in societal attitude toward knowledge--rather than being impressed by the person who knows the most, we are impressed by those who know how to find the most. I saw this story as a projection into a future where we have gone to such an extreme in this kind of technology that without that tech we are mentally crippled. The reason our minds can process some things better than computers is because of our associative memory. In this future, that associative memory has been outsourced to a gadget. This girl has experienced everything in life that we experience today, and she can remember it all with her glasses, through a series of #hashtags. But remove the hashtags from the equation and she can barely function. In the end, she learns nothing from the exchange, except that she doesn't want to be friends with the snotty celebrity anymore.

"A Happy Family" was an odd bizarro story with a lot of fun lines. I think my favorites were:
-Where the mother says that even a celery stalk would've been better than a boot, and the father hustles the mother out of the room because he feels so bad that the boot was in hearing.
-Where they set out to make a second boot, and that they didn't know much about shoemaking but they went about it the only way they knew how.

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 5:10 pm
by tbaker2500
Get out of bed on the right side today, Strawdude? It's bright and sunny where I am.

I loved this Trifecta. It was grand to get back to stories which are silly and fun, for no good reason. It leaves a smile on my face.

The interview was excellent, I always enjoy both hearing the perspectives of another drabblecast listener, and also hearing Norm in a more protracted unscripted dialog.

And for those who wanted another apocalypse story, well I'm sure there are more in the pipeline!

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 8:48 pm
by normsherman
tbaker2500 wrote: And for those who wanted another apocalypse story, well I'm sure there are more in the pipeline!
psychic!

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:16 pm
by Talia
Best Trifecta ever. A perfect storm of weirdness! 'Boot' in particular made me giggle, particularly the last line, which I somehow didn't see coming. :)

Loooved the concept of the first story as well. Deliciously silly. And again, great last line. :)

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:21 am
by El Barto
I really liked the Tags story. Had you run it 15 years ago it would have seemed like completely nutso science fiction. And now it is quite nearly reality. Technology really sneaks up on us sometimes.

And I loved the ending of the Nun story. It is sadly all too rare these days for nuns to go rogue. And for the record I figured the nun story contained those graphic descriptions in large part because most nuns don't spend much time in such close proximity to the carnal stump.

However, I did not much like the Happy Family story at all. It wasn't just that it was bizarre and weird -- I love those things. It was that it crossed the border into Absurdi-surdi-stan-stan because it was obviously not even possibly rational in any universe I know of. Which may seem odd to say here in the land of the weird but my sense is that most everything else I hear on the Drabblecast is remotely possible, even if highly unlikely. And that is part of what makes those stories stick with me. That said, I can't deny that there were some very clever lines in the story that made me chuckle.

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 3:47 pm
by strawman
El Barto wrote: However, I did not much like the Happy Family story at all. It wasn't just that it was bizarre and weird -- I love those things. It was that it crossed the border into Absurdi-surdi-stan-stan because it was obviously not even possibly rational in any universe I know of. Which may seem odd to say here in the land of the weird but my sense is that most everything else I hear on the Drabblecast is remotely possible, even if highly unlikely. And that is part of what makes those stories stick with me. That said, I can't deny that there were some very clever lines in the story that made me chuckle.
I started out in agreement but, as if conjured up by a devil's advocate perched on my shoulder, a memory of a story called "Socks" arose and knocked me clear off the opinion. I mean, unless you think it remotely possible that a sock in a dryer might sacrifice its life for its mate. But maybe it's just that socks are inherently more plausible than shoes.

Such is life in the strange lane.

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 8:05 pm
by El Barto
strawman wrote: I started out in agreement but, as if conjured up by a devil's advocate perched on my shoulder, a memory of a story called "Socks" arose and knocked me clear off the opinion. I mean, unless you think it remotely possible that a sock in a dryer might sacrifice its life for its mate. But maybe it's just that socks are inherently more plausible than shoes.

Such is life in the strange lane.
That's a great point. On paper, this story and Socks seem to both be completely absurd but somehow Socks worked. Perhaps because it was "only" anthropomorphizing socks and their feelings and this story asked us to believe that a woman was pregnant with a boot. Or that when the boot came out it wouldn't be an astonishing bizarre front page news story. I guess the absurdity here just implicated too much normal life and that caused the contrast to be too much (for me). But I really loved Socks.

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 2:38 am
by Kibitzer
I enjoyed all these stories but "A Happy Family" had me laughing out loud! It was wonderfully odd and the ending just capped it all off. Well read, too - I loved the subtle emphasis on the word "boot" each time. Fantastic!

Re: Drabblecast 220 - Trifecta XVIII

Posted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 5:46 am
by cinnamon
strawman wrote: I would like to express gratitude to JR for his sponsorship. But the interview was probably not the most effective way to excite appetite for his stories.
Well, I wouldn't say excited my appetite, but it did remind I'd meant to pick it up, so I guess it did its job.


Anyway. I don't know why, but I loved "A Happy Family" so much. Imagining the boot sitting around in a crib, just... being a boot... was cracking me up fiercely... and I was on an airplane at the time so I took a few strange looks from my neighbors. "Tags" seemed a bit too close for comfort. And I liked "Bad Habit" ok, didn't love or hate. I will probably think of it as "That Penis Story" whenever I can't remember the name, though.