In the Maw of the Beast

100 word stories. Post all you like, maybe we'll dip in and use yours?
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Flintknapper
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In the Maw of the Beast

Post by Flintknapper » Wed Oct 09, 2013 7:18 pm

The handler releases the beast. It races forward. I see the rage in its eyes. The beast collides into me. I lose my footing and fall to the ground. Its teeth bite deep into my forearm. I flail wildly seeking escape, but my struggle appears only to feed the beast’s appetite.

Then, flesh separates from bone. I am free. My feet find earth and I struggle to stand upright, but the beast pushes me down once again. Claws tear into my belly and thighs. Mercifully, the beast's maw catches hold of my throat. It bites deep. I await the inevitable.

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Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by Flintknapper » Wed Oct 09, 2013 7:19 pm

Happy almost Columbus Day everyone... I think.

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strawman
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Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by strawman » Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:18 pm

I read yesterday that the Chinese discovered America long before Columbus, and that American Natives have Chinese genes. It suggested to me that someone has discovered some rich old coot and is looking for a way to document a plausible familial relationship, so when the old guy's bank forecloses on your mortgage, you can make a counterclaim that you're the legitimate heir to his estate.

But let me ask this: If you had been Columbus, what would you have done differently?
Never judge anyone until you have biopsied their brain.

"Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle."
Known Some Call Is Air Am
Spoiler:
Non sum qualis eram = "I am not who I will be"

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Flintknapper
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Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by Flintknapper » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:01 pm

strawman wrote:I read yesterday that the Chinese discovered America long before Columbus, and that American Natives have Chinese genes. It suggested to me that someone has discovered some rich old coot and is looking for a way to document a plausible familial relationship, so when the old guy's bank forecloses on your mortgage, you can make a counterclaim that you're the legitimate heir to his estate.

But let me ask this: If you had been Columbus, what would you have done differently?
Perhaps the Chinese did and it isn't a bad tactic... but did the Chinese use dogs to tear Indians to pieces???

Well truth be told Columbus probably didn't either, but certainly those who came after him did. It was a popular tactic among the conquistadors. In New Mexico, Coronado had the "Turk" put to the dogs. I was thinking of the Turk when I wrote this one, but he was far from the only one. Also I am not sure it was over so fast for the turk. The guy in this story was lucky. I only had a 100 word limit.

As for the Chinese discovering America... they probably knew about it... hell Native Americans are probably a mix of Polynesian and northern Asiatic gene pools. There is even a book that argues the Zuni are actually long lost Japanese (which isn't remotely true)... but the Chinese if they knew really did not exploit the existence of the American continents. Neither did the norse for that matter.

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strawman
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Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by strawman » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:41 pm

It seems to me that Columbus is mostly guilty of things the people who came after him did. Considering the wholesale human sacrifice of the Mayans, practices of the Comanche, etc it appears that most of the evidence points to bestialism being pretty normal behavior of humans of most races and cultures. The Vikings just never got around to exploiting their American discoveries, because Europe was more profitable and easier to get to. I don't know. Solzhenytsin said the line dividing good and evil runs through each human heart, and to overcome evil means to destroy part of one's own heart. So we'd much rather believe we can overcome evil by eliminating it in others.

So I read your drabble thinking of myself as both the handler and the victim, and find it even more frightening.

I suppose I could also look at it as a kind of Carreyish Me, Myself, and Irene parody. But that would be another drabble.
Never judge anyone until you have biopsied their brain.

"Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle."
Known Some Call Is Air Am
Spoiler:
Non sum qualis eram = "I am not who I will be"

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Flintknapper
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Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by Flintknapper » Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:01 pm

See I don't know. I think Columbus as an innocent is hard to go with. He brought slaves back with him on his second voyage. Not like one or two... he brought back hundreds. By the time he was going back for the 3rd and 4th times, he knew damn well what he was doing. Natives were dropping like flies by 1498.

I think the idea that Native Americans committed atrocities against each other as an angle also falls flat. Certainly they did, but the genocide and mass murder committed by the "enlightened" Europeans was on a scale well beyond anything the indigenous societies of the Americas could muster.

However, I agree with the concept. Everyone is evil and everyone is good. The real thing they do not tell you in highschool is that the Europeans were the catalyst, but the atrocities were primarily committed by Native Americans against Native Americans. Even here at Jemez it is hard to have to explain to the public that De Vargas reconquered the area with an army of Keres and Tiwa Indians and that the price of Jemez submission was the Jemez supply troops to attack the Tewa holding out on Black Mesa. It was divide and conquer.

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strawman
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Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by strawman » Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:26 pm

Yes, the colonists from different countries and the natives from different tribes all jockeyed around to partner with the winners. So it wasn't as much a racial conflict as tribal conflict (if you look at French, British, and American as tribes as well). But it seems strange that you would see irony in native groups dividing to conquer but not see it the same way between the French and British, which were basically proxy wars between Catholics and Protestants, antecedent to the proxy wars between capitalists and communists, or Liberals and Conservatives.

What may have seemed like a defense of Columbus was actually a question of what you would have done differently if you had been him. That supposes you perceived the world as he saw it.

You mention his taking of slaves. Common practice among most native people groups. Those defeated in war are either tortured, killed, or enslaved. You claim the scale was different. But that perception may be distorted. How can we see, when all our teachers seem to start with the point they want to prove, and then look only at evidence that supports that position? That seems to be something you can pretty much count on across the human spectrum.
Never judge anyone until you have biopsied their brain.

"Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle."
Known Some Call Is Air Am
Spoiler:
Non sum qualis eram = "I am not who I will be"

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Flintknapper
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Posts: 240
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 9:06 pm
Location: Jemez Springs, New Mexico

Re: In the Maw of the Beast

Post by Flintknapper » Thu Oct 10, 2013 2:40 am

normally I live with what my mind comes up with, but on this one. I didn't like the original wording. So I tweaked it a lot. Still should be 100 words.

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