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What's your favorite Drabblecast genre?

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:34 am
by tastycakes
Do you find that you like a lot of Drabblecast stories that fit into a certain genre? Zombie? Post-Apocalyptic? Post-Apocalyptic Zombie? If so, please share your favorite genre here so that we can help Norm get the kinds of stories you like on your favorite podcast (or at least the Drabblecast).

I guess my favorite would be the absurd stories e.g. B&W Animals, Creatures in Disguise, 2135 (Current B-sides), Warmth of the Sun, and stories like that.

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:06 pm
by Kevin Anderson
I think the big three speculative genres are pretty well represented on the drabblecast, but I’d love to hear some more apocalyptic horror or scifi. But please don’t go looking to fill a genre quota or anything. What I enjoy about the drabblecast is that its a genre smorgasbord.

The best drabblecast stories, the ones that resonate the most with listeners, are the ones that seem to be on the edge of a dream, one foot in this world and one in the surreal, like Jelly Park. – A wonderful dream-like fantasy, that didn’t take itself too seriously.

And although Norm cracks me up almost weekly, I think humor is under represented in the stories. I thought some of the stories this year took themselves WAY to seriously, like that damn Halloween story. Jeez, where did you dig that up?

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 3:32 pm
by Mr. Tweedy
Favorite genre? Actually, what I like best about the story selection is their great variety. You never know what you're going to get. One week it's Witchcraft in the Harem, and next week it's The Storyteller. The genre requirements here are so broad that you can hear literally any type of story.

My favorite stories don't really fall into a genre. I'm thinking of Jelly Park, The Beekeepers, On Dasher, the Toys of Peace, Floating Over Time and Magic in the Harem as real "killer app" stories that illustrate the Drabblecats' greatness, and those all come from completely different genre divisions.

With the standard of stories being strange so broadly defined, it seems like the only real standard is that stories be good, and you can't beat that.

In the future, I would like to hear more stories that I wasn't expecting.

I know, I'm not very helpful. :P

Posted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 1:54 am
by cammoblammo
While I find the Drabblecast a great source of strange ickiness (The Worm Within, Code Brown, the exploding cat one), horror (umm. Sizzle? The Crazy? I forget) and straight weirdness (anything by Samantha Henderson or Frank Key) it's the stories that renew my faith in humanity that get me going. This might include Jelly Park, the space colonist drabble we had last week, and so on.

If I go away with an icky or frightening image, I'm glad to have listened. If a story makes me proud to be a human, it's a winner.

my thoughts

Posted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 9:45 pm
by StalinSays
Kevin Anderson wrote:I think the big three speculative genres are pretty well represented on the drabblecast
I'd agree to that. I've loved the small tastes of 'comedic exchange,' we've received, but await that epic, full-on take. One of my favorite sections of any DC was the Norm and Norm back and forth about Mer'Babies. I think the Squidges episode was starting to drift towards the idea, as was in a way Reality Bites! and Panel Discussion. Neither though really lingered and walked it out. A really mad-cap, funny story, with a sci fi or horror twist to mention, but focused on a series of dialogue exchanges between like-minded smart-asses would be my uber-tale. Something like the Norm / WTT project 'Awesome Man' but with all the drabble bases covered. Shaun of the Dead for the podcast realm.

On the other side of the coin, I do love Norm's approach to grotesque situations, and breathy, revelatory description. A few more straight horror pieces like Synesthesia, Hush & Hark, Wiggly People, and Hog Faced Man would please me plenty.

Posted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 2:19 pm
by G. E. Lee
I'm with Mr. Tweedy. I really love the edgy stuff, but I get a kick out of stories like "The Worm Within."
I guess one of the things that keeps me listening is that you never really know what's coming down the pike.

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 3:02 am
by tbaker2500
Oh dear, Kendall and Norm are fighting again. Now now, children.

I think you are asking the wrong question. Drabblecast shouldn't subscribe to genre's. If I were to espouse on my deepest reason for listening to the DC's and what I want to hear, out of ANY genre...


This is a true history. I discovered DC around ep 10 or so, when EP ran a promo. This is a point in my life where I was suffering from excruciating panic attacks. Seriously debilitating. There were a lot of health problems in my family, I was running my own business, etc. I listened to Escape Pod while taking long walks to force my mind somewhere else. But, most of EP was, frankly, nerdy underdogs escaping to another reality.

Then along comes this strange guy with a crappy microphone in a tin can reading really strange crap. ( I was (honestly) just about to send him a SM58 microphone I had sitting around right when he cleaned up the audio. )

The DC really broke me out of some of my tough panic times. It made me appreciate life a bit more, and hold my chin up a bit higher. There was something actually inspiring about the podcast.

I took me a long time to figure out what that special something was. I don't know if I'm right or wrong, but here goes:
Norm appears to work on a regular basis with many special people, handicapped, retarded, etc. He seems to have taken from that a certain attitude of life being a little bigger than each of our preconceptions. His podcast verbiage, and the stories that were chosen, seemed to say "What, you think you're the center of this universe, bitch?" It may seem strange, but when I heard that eye opening tone, it was the perfect thing to kick me out of a given panic attack and smile a bit. Yeah, ya know- there are a lot of people in this world trying to survive every day in their own strange, strange way. And you're just one of them.

Since then and with a lot of hard work I'm past panic attacks, and I don't need to use the DC in any way as anything but entertainment. But every time I hear an episode written by an unusual person, chosen by unusual people, and produced by a strange-ass dude, it brings a smile to my face.

Any to DC's credit, you haven't lost it yet. Pretty impressive this many episodes in.

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 6:57 am
by normsherman
Wow, that's actually more awesome than any donation Tom, thanks! Well... I mean, not any donation I guess. But safely any donation below 300 bucks or so. Thanks still.

Genre smanre, when Kendall and I fight it's usually regarding how loud the music is coming from his dad and I's room. Barry White isn't for everyone. But still, in an ongoing effort to keep things aloof, we wanna know what people want and expect from us so that we can shove things that are completely different at them.

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 9:22 pm
by tastycakes
Thanks again TB. We don't fight too often unless its over a hot piece of Dad-ass that walked in a bar. Thankfully we have some similar tastes, or at least respect each other's opinion. And then there's also luke, who um...

I think what you're trying to say is Norm is the anti-christ, and this is something that I thought more people would have recognized by now.

I just think for the work that myself, and Norm (to a much greater degree) are putting into this, we would like to see a bigger result. That doesn't mean monetarily, but more je ne sais crois. This is mostly a good thing though, b/c it keeps us wanting to make The DC greater and greater. Of course, while we want to get better, we don't want to do it at the expense of the DC faithful. [/i]

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 9:25 pm
by tastycakes
Oh, and I agree that humor is tragically under-represented in The DC, but there aren't a lot of (good) humor subs. If you have any favorite flash fiction humor authors, tell us, or better yet, tell them about us.

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:36 pm
by Ministry of Canuckulture
Je ne sais crois?! Tete de stigmata!!! C'est 'Je ne sais quoi '.
Vraiment, eh Tristan? Ay'??

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:03 am
by tastycakes
AH! Now that makes a lot more sense to me.

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:04 am
by tastycakes
It's good to see that Canadians (at least some anyway) are good for something: spell-checking our French.

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 1:46 am
by Ministry of Canuckulture
Pas de lieu Rhone que nous, eh, GateauxSavoureux?

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:12 am
by normsherman
tastycakes wrote:It's good to see that Canadians (at least some anyway) are good for something: spell-checking our French.
ZING

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:10 am
by Mr. Tweedy
tastycakes wrote:It's good to see that Canadians (at least some anyway) are good for something: spell-checking our French.
All the more reason to conquer them.

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:49 am
by tbaker2500
tastycakes wrote:I just think for the work that myself, and Norm (to a much greater degree) are putting into this, we would like to see a bigger result. That doesn't mean monetarily, but more je ne sais crois. This is mostly a good thing though, b/c it keeps us wanting to make The DC greater and greater. Of course, while we want to get better, we don't want to do it at the expense of the DC faithful. [/i]
My humble opinions here, as every situation is different, but...

If thou dost go more "mainstream" thou wilst find thyself in a very big kettle of fish. Do what you do well, and thy name will be made. Once thy has name, you become mainstream.

I mean, how many millions of geeks are there going to class everyday who would get such a kick out of this counter-culture crap? I think putting effort into the less-satisfying effort of marketing will bear more fruit than your average fish.

Hmm... how do we target college and high-schools? I'm kinda pass that social point... where to kids learn about stuff like this these days? Social networking?

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:57 am
by tbaker2500
Ooo! Ooo! I know! I know! (Raises hand)

Submit the series to each college and high-school run radio station out there. Approach them with this free material for their struggling non-profit stations. I keep thinking of Resonance FM, and how they'd eat this sort of thing up.

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 1:29 pm
by strawman
tbaker2500 wrote:Ooo! Ooo! I know! I know! (Raises hand)

Submit the series to each college and high-school run radio station out there. Approach them with this free material for their struggling non-profit stations. I keep thinking of Resonance FM, and how they'd eat this sort of thing up.
Bona fide

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:59 pm
by Mr. Tweedy
I know advertising costs money... But I'd bet you'd get some results if you advertised in a few strategic places. For instance, I confess to reading Girl Genius 3 times a week. If a banner reading "Strange stories by strange authors for strange listeners" had appeared at the top of that page, I would surely have clicked it and found myself here.

I used to skip-listen through a podcast called "The Wiire" that absolutely sucked, but they've managed to get almost 10,000 people registered on their forum because their podcast is about the Wii. Dropping an ad on a page like that–that's frequented by many geeky folks but is probably cheap to advertise on–could be good bang for your buck.

Trading promos with other podcasts is good, but then you're competing for the relatively small market of people who already listen to fiction podcasts. It might be more effective to do non-audio promos in places where people aren't necessarily expecting to hear about new fiction podcasts.

I'm doing advertising for my own business right now. It's too early to tell if it's worked yet (I only started doing this at the beginning of this month), but, rather than pay up the wazoo to advertise in a newspaper or spam mail to 10,000 addressed, I've made my own mailers and am sending them to people who I think might be likely to want my services. I am able to send a personalized mailer to 500 specific people for less than it would have cost me to buy a small ad in the Chicago Tribune that no one would have seen.

Anyway: That's an idea. Find a few places online that meet the criteria of being geek haunts and low-rent.

Another idea you might try is contacting your local new organizations. Reporters are really, really lazy, slothful people and you might find one who's glad to have a human-interest story come knocking on their door ("This is great! I don't even have to get out of my chair for this story!") If you could get a newspaper or even a TV station to feature the Drabblecast (of Norm's work in general) as a news story, you'd be getting the best free advertising around.

I'd write an article about you if I were a reporter. Of course, I quit my newspaper because it was run by idiots...

But whatever you do, don't change the podcast to make it more "mainstream." The Drabblecast is genuinely good. It even has those occasional moments of genius. Don't dumb it down for the masses. Artists should raise the masses up to their level, not pander.